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Department email: romance.studies@mail.huji.ac.il

Department Secretary: Ms. Adva Cohen 
Room 4505, Office hours: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 10:00-13:00
Tel: 02-5883616
advac@savion.huji.ac.il
 

Department Chair: Dr. Yona Hanhart-Marmor
yona.hanhart-marmor@mail.huji.ac.il

 

Research Students

Benjamin Freidenberg

Benjamin Freidenberg

benjamin.freidenberg@mail.huji.ac.il

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Benjamin Freidenberg is a film director who graduated with honors from the Sam Spiegel Film & Television School Jerusalem. Currently, he is a PhD candidate at the Department of Romance Studies and lectures at the Bezalel Academy's Screen-Based Arts Department. Supervised by Dr. Yona Hanhart-Marmor, his dissertation focuses on film language research developed in Post-WWII France inspired by the intersection between literature and the arts. Parallel with his work in the film industry, he studied linguistics for a bachelor's and master's degrees. Supervised by Prof. Elitzur Bar-Asher Siegal, his thesis dealt with the linkage between historical linguistics and the development of the filmic craft, specifically targeting the syntax and semantics of film. This interdisciplinary study which engages linguistics and cinema studies, involved the research of semantic changes in verbs indicating object movement and comparing it with historical changes in the meaning of camera movement in films.  Among his research interests: historical syntax, aesthetics, metaphor and metonymy, visual vs. textual aspects of Egyptian hieroglyphs, Maya and ancient Asian script.

 

Member of the Israel Film Academy and contributor to film preservation projects at the Israel Film Archive in the Jerusalem Cinematheque and the Judaica Division Images Collections of Harvard University. Recipient of the America-Israel scholarships for outstanding artists and the International Association of Film & Television Schools' prize for outstanding filmmakers and scholars.  
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Eva Himo Saadeh

Eva Himo Saadeh

eva.himo-saadeh@mail.huji.ac.il

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My name is Eva Himo Saadeh, I am 33 years old and a mother of 4 children. I was born in Israel and lived in Jerusalem my whole life. Among the many languages I learned in school – English, Arabic, Hebrew and French – I loved French the most. Since then, my love for French never faded, and therefore I decided to study French literature and translation at university. So, after many discussions with my parents, I enrolled at the university as a student of French. For me, studying French is a great pleasure and a treasure. In 2010 I finished my B.A-degree in French and have been working as a French teacher until today. At the same time, I kept participating in a “café littéraire” (literary café) where we read and analyzed works of French literature together. I had no doubts that the Hebrew University would be the most suitable place for me to fulfill my dream, expand my knowledge and get my M.A. in French. Despite all the ups and downs, I still feel incredibly excited to learn more. After fulfilling my dream and getting my master’s degree I would like to change my whole life, and I look forward to working with my certificate since it is my pleasure, and to overcome all the hard phases I passed through in order to be well educated and sufficiently empowered. To learn languages is always wonderful, but to learn French is a treasure and a pleasure.

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Asaf Koliner

Asaf Koliner

asaf.koliner@mail.huji.ac.il

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My name is Asaf Koliner, born and raised in Israel.

As a lover of cinema as well as history, I attended the ‘Sam Spiegel’ film school, and later moved on to complete a B.A. in ‘History and Film Studies’ and a M.A. in Philosophy in the Hebrew University (specializing in Aesthetics, Historiography, and Intellectual History). My M.A. thesis examined closely the aesthetics and narrational processes of a very unique semi-documentary semi-history film called ‘La Commune (Paris, 1871)’ by director Peter Watkins (France, 1999).

I am currently working on my doctoral thesis, whose subject is the engagement with socio-political issues through the use of generic modes of expression in the Italian popular cinema of the 1970's. The case of Italian cinema was a calculated, yet a natural, choice for me. No other national cinema was as committed as Italy’s to the representation of the socio-political problems of its country. Yet, it is little known that this commitment extended beyond the unique works of Italy’s film “artists”, and far into the vast universe of popular genres.

All along this road, it seems, I was preoccupied in one way or another with the phenomenology of genre, this already-familiar pattern of story or aesthetics that we intuitively recognize in works of fiction. I believe that identifying and interpreting the diverse genres that might appear in texts is an excellent tool for the cultural historians, a tool that might allow them to retrace, alongside the formal continuations and transformations that characterize the evolution of genres, also the evolutions of ideas, values, and ideologies.

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